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Facebook risks a fine of up to €100 million from Belgian DPA

A Belgian court has warned Facebook that the company could face a fine of nearly €100 million in case it does not stop tracking consumers on third-party websites. The case has been initiated by Belgium's Privacy watchdog and the social media company has been obliged to delete all data that it gathered illegally about Belgian citizens. In the court's opinion, Facebook fails to provide adequate information about its information gathering activities, which are carried out without consent.

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Luxembourg DPA releases a data breach notification form

Luxembourg’s Commission Nationale pour la Protection des Données (CNPD) has issued a form to help providers of publicly available electronic communications services reach the data breach notification requirements of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The data breach notification form is available (in French) here
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Atlanta judge approves a .25M settlement on a 2014 data breach

Judge Thomas Thrash from Atlanta has approved a settlement of .25 million for the Home Depot’s data breach, occurred in 2014. This decision has concluded a complex lawsuit involving thousands of financial institutions.

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ICO’s report wins the Global Privacy and Data Protection Award

The report issued by the UK ICO entitled “Big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning and data protection” has demonstrated all its fundamental values winning the Global Privacy and Data Protection Award.  The document reflects the strong efforts made in the field of data protection by the Office, and represents an important instrument to acquire information on this complex matter.

The report is available here
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Impeding police access to personal devices and not sharing personal passwords may be illegal under UK Terrorism Act

Mr. Muhammad Rabbani, international director of an advocacy group fighting the violations caused by counter-terrorism policies (named CAGE), was found guilty of voluntary obstruction or attempt to impede the development of an inspection by a UK judge.  The grounds for the conviction are with the Schedule 7 of the 2000 Terrorism Act.  Mr. Rabbani had been asked by the British airport police to disclose the password of his devices but refused to comply with the request due to alleged sensitive data contained in the devices.  Mr. Rabbani has announced appeal against the decision for violation of his personal privacy.

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